Concordance to Personal Impressions

compiled by Nick Hall

Personal Impressions was first published in 1980. Since then, two further editions have been published, each adding new material. The third edition (2014) uses a freshly revised text, which should be used in all new translations. This concordance does not include the new material found in the third edition.

1980 First line (1980) 1998 US 2014
vii This volume consists of writings that resemble what ix xxxi
viii Franco, Salazar and various dictators in Eastern x xxxii
ix This is the last of four volumes in which I have xi xxxv
x as Mr Churchill in 1940 by John Murray of London xii xxxix
xi Randolph Churchill, Jacob Herzog and Arthur Lehning xiii xxxviii
xiii The éloge is not much favoured as a xv 441
xiv Isaiah Berlin ignores these current fashions xv 442
xv That interpretation is pluralism. How the xvi 443
xvi men and implacable women, planners, moving xvii 444
xvii be protected and fostered at whatever cost. xviii 445
xviii Berlin declares that sometimes they cannot. xix 447
xix time has invested ideas with such personality xx–xxi 448
xx those of the scholars who later interpret them. xxii 449
xxi a fierce believer in one ideology after another, xxiii 450–1
xxii of nations. Berlin’s style reflects his own xxiv 452
xxiii establishment, the self-important and the pompous xxv 453
xxiv firmly in their place, he became even more xxvi 454
xxv about Weizmann, he notes how ‘martyrs, failures, xxvii 456
xxvi and hence in some discomfort. Against, it was painful xxviii 457
xxvii Chaim Weizmann. No explanation of how it came xxix 458
xxviii true. But their criticisms pale beside these xxx 460
xxix Huxley for extending the panorama of knowledge xxxi 461
xxx reader to guess who they were. Like Hamlet he xxxii 462
1 In the now remote year 1928, an eminent 1 1
2 highly – humility, integrity, humanity, scrupulous 2 3
3 contemporary thought and feeling only because it 3 4
4 or between what is conceived as permanent and what 4 5
5 Palace. His eye is never that of the neatly 5 7
6 completely fused with the first; art and nature 6 8
7 a long and stormy career, altered them at all. If 7 9
8 is the most powerful single influence upon everything 8 11
9 added, fantasy, which is less frightened by the 9 12
10 produced by such established writers as Shaw and Wells 10 13
11 and devoted subordinates would throw themselves 11 15
12 which his enemies – and his victims – never 12 16
13 blithely cutting Gordian knots in a manner which often 13 17
14 These splendid sentences hardly do justice to his own 14 18
15 from a capacity for sustained introspective brooding, 15 19–20
16 tension which, if it lasts, destroys all sense of 16 21
17 method of constructing historical narrative, the 17 22
18 indeed, from our distant vantage point, this is 18 23
19 unable to focus those pin-points of concentrated 19 25
20 which perhaps only those who live in valleys are 20 26
21 social, almost a metaphysical order – a sacred 21 27
22 Hopkins understood and encouraged to the fullest degree 22 28–9
23 I never met Roosevelt, and although I spent more 24 37
24 Peace Ballot, the Left Book Club, Malraux’s political 25 39
25 high in the United States, faith in businessmen as 26 40
26 and possessed wide political horizons, imaginative 27 41
27 Indeed he was very different from Wilson. For they 28 43
28 out of wood and what out of marble, and how and when 29 44
29 or Charles James Fox, or some of the Russian, Italian 30 45
30 compatibly with helping to promote the victory of 31 46
31 career of an American patrician with moderate political 32 48
32 Chaim Weizmann’s achievement – and the details 34 57
33 action, the great man seems able, almost alone and 35 59
34 define in terms of such concepts as nations, race, 36 60
35 ‘way of life’? Apart from the fact that they 37 61
36 state of their own. These remained idle fancies which 38 63
37 declaring that the Jews did not wish – and did not 39 64
38 western Europe. Speaking their own language, largely 40 65
39 They were what they were; they might dislike their 41 66
40 it for granted. The prospect of nationhood without 42 68
41 still faithful to the ancient religion, were resolved 43 69
42 and hopeful attitude to life; in particular, respect 44 70
43 content which he poured into ideas he received from 45 71
44 doctrine, but as a movement which they accepted naturally 46 73
45 powerful, self-confident, solid champion of their 47 74
46 The failures of the Zionist movement – and they 48 75
47 appeared to him to be useful, as a means for limited 49 76
48 as secure positions in modern society, achieved after 50 78
49 that these debates are not extant. Never can two 51 79
50 all. For in his case, as in that of virtually every statesman52 80
51 British Government and himself, and he regarded those 53 81
52 the greatest courage and integrity; but I should be less 54 83
53 eastern Europe, for much the same reasons, in the 55 84
54 Perhaps Weizmann was carried away too far by his 56 86
55 [con]sisted in painting a very vivid, detailed, coherent, 57 87
56 When war broke out in 1939, he offered to lay aside some 58 88
57 new world, and especially the new, post-Chamberlain 59 89
58 officials, who took their cue from their superiors, or 60 91
59 own close followers he seemed, if anything, altogether 61 92
60 position of splendid symbolic value, but little power. 62 93
61 of the world’s press. Even more he hated stupidity, 63 94
62 denied; that moral force, if it was competently organised 64 96
63 This account of Lewis Namier is based upon no research 91 121
64 with incomparable imagination and a power of incisive 92 123
65 He stood in the middle of my room and spoke his words 93 124
66 in a false position, and realised that the converted 94 125
67 recognition and so on. Nor was human history, and 95 127
68 Gentiles, could live full lives either by dedication 96 128
69 I felt flattered by his visit, as well as deeply impressed 97 129
70 expected to enjoy his open and highly articulate contempt. 98 130–1
71 [impor]tant; when in form he spoke marvellously. He spoke 99 132
72 write our English history? Why do you not write Jewish 100 133
73 would not soon forget, and which would probably 101 134
74 In 1941 I was employed by the Ministry of Information 102 136
75 When war was declared Namier volunteered for the British 103 137
76 any other talented writer of the past, whom the rich 104 138
77 some implacable enemies. Yet despite his acuteness, 105 139
78 and fascinating man, or one more deeply plunged in the 106 141
79 of history – a subject which he believed to be 107 142
80 only reason for distrusting party labels and 108 143
81 almost isolable, sensations; that Freud looked for 109 145
82 criteria of its inadequacy, because it had failed to 110 146
83 I first met Felix Frankfurter in, I think, the first 112 97
84 to interrupt) in a state of complete and silent fascination 113 99
85 cast a sharp look round the room and decided to make a break 114 100
86 although he supposed that Holmes had been even more 115 101
87 not know what impact he made on Oxford lawyers or the 116 102
88 intensely self-conscious and inhibited society – to 117 104
89 Street, and came back report that Wittgenstein had 118 105
90 here. But it is these last, and not the attributes 119 106
91 When I first knew Richard Pares, in the early 1930s, he 120 50
92 partly because he was attracted by order and formal 121 52
93 teachers of his generation. He was attached to his 122 53
94 He was an excellent civil servant during the war; there 123 54
95 to protect his life against the chaos of the public world 124 55
96 When Hubert Henderson first came to All Souls in 125 30
97 one himself. This made the experience of talking with 126 32
98 not in the least vain, not in the least difficult; he had 127 33
99 too violently the pressure of his friends. I doubt if 128 34
100 idiosyncrasies, no virtuoso flights, no conscious exercise 129 36
101 The philosophical trend which afterwards came to be 130 156
102 whatever could be so reduced to plain prose. Despite 130 158
103 [Never]theless the positivist attack, especially in the 132 159
104 deadliest enemies of this kind of realist metaphysics were 133 160
105 by a particular doctrine – he often produced the 134 162
106 and a method to which it was his mission to convert 135 163
107 year or two before, read an interesting book on philosophy 136 164
108 and indeed excited by the simplicity and lucidity 137 165
109 personal identity, and the related topic of our knowledge 138 167
110 language as used about the external world: the problems 139 168
111 traveller called Gregor Samsa, who wakes one morning 140 169
112 called ‘ostensive definitions’. The contradictories 141 170–1
113 classify the normal use of words. It seemed to him then, 142 172
114 Nevertheless, his implicit rejection of the doctrine of 143 173
115 seemed to me before the last war, that Austin understood 144 174
116 John Plamenatz was born in 1912 in Cetinje, the 146 177
117 some ways he resembled), all his life he displayed 147 179
118 the slightest hint of rhetoric. He did not speak unless 148 180
119 understand their basic concepts, their views of man 149 181
120 ambition to shine, or to defeat rivals, or to 150 183
121 His books give the impression of being written as if no 151 184
122 thought and said. He was not particularly happy at 152 185
123 Maurice Bowra, scholar, critic and administrator, the 154 148
124 Stefan George, appealed to him far more than British 155 150
125 pleasure he took in the many honours he received. 156 151
126 crossed that country on his way to his family’s home 157 152
127 leadership the Academy prospered. But it was Oxford 158 154
128 His attitude to religion was more complicated and obscure 159 155
129 In the early spring of 1946, when I was still a 183 187
130 devoted to his mother and his sisters; that he had joined 184 189
131 obsolescent concept – a gentleman. He was totally 185 190
132 to hear out to the end), but also with a certain unexpected 186 191
133 efforts to be elected to Parliament were not likely to 187 192
134 Nothing he said could ever make one wince. He was 188 194
135 The Classical and History Middle and Upper Eighth 189 108
136 Aldous Huxley: in particular Point Counter Point, 190 110
137 to everyone present. The company played intellectual games 191 111
138 or supernormal better than much conventional physiology 192 112
139 to irrational idols and destructive passions – forces 193 114
140 that he stood on the frontier between the old astrology 194 115
141 [pre]ferred to call spiritual – factors, in which 195 116
142 Mr Huxley, in your book Jesting Pilate, speak in 196 117–18
143 decided that it was not as unsightly as he had supposed, 197 119
144 Albert Einstein’s chief title to immortal fame is 66 195
145 [anthro]pology. Social Darwinism, founded on a 67 197
146 been successfully rendered in popular language as 68 198
147 education in the 1890s. He studied intermittently in 69 199
148 to his natural habits of thought. Our forefathers 70 201
149 Arabs of Palestine. He wished for a state in which Jews 71 202
150 wait for the Messiah – the world revolution – 72 203
151 young man, have chosen to adopt Swiss, or, after Hitler, 73 204
152 spirit. Like Spinoza, he conceived God as reason embodied 74 206
153 enemies on the left – an illusion of many decent and 75 207
154 abstract thinker – Thales who falls into a well, the 76 208
155 and this state and stood by it through thick and thin, 77 210
156 In the summer of 1945, while I was working as a temporary 198 356
157 it was much more hopeful and even enthusiastic: the 199 357
158 confluences in literature, as well as Acmeism, ego- and 199 358
159 which side would win, this alone, for a time, gave a 201 359
160 known bounds; self-prostration, false and wildly 202 361
161 for the most part circulated privately in manuscript 203 362
162 translations into the various national languages of 204 364
163 interest, critical and uncritical, of the Soviet public 205 365
164 publication, The British Ally, to which Soviet writers 206 366
165 were young and defiant and full of ideas; it did not matter 207 367
166 reminded him of the visit to Russia of the American 208 369
167 the Revolution; like all intellectuals of any independence 209 370
168 fame abroad, than I could have wished, for fear of 210 371
169 and Dickens, but before I could continue he went on to say 211 373
170 of political issues, was no danger to democratic 212 374
171 the absence of formalities and small talk which seemed 213 375
172 west, and there were, at the time, not many Soviet 214 377
173 my prose – it was influenced by what was the weakest 215 378
174 psychological and artistic crisis” – this has 216 379
175 ordinary people cannot, and know that they cannot, do 217 380
176 went on apologising until the train arrived. No one 218 382
177 and we entered different carriages – the conversation 219 383
178 deep root among the intelligentsia. By 1956 there was 220 384
179 towards Marina Tsvetaeva, to whom he had been bound 221 385
180 writers he admired Heine, Hermann Cohen (his 222 387
181 alone, before a polished desk on which not a book or 223 388
182 was his indispensable meeting with Stalin, that it must 224 389
183 from the other side of the world to tell him what to 225 390–1
184 him a kind of half-hearted effort to write civic 226 392
185 for me by the gate and let Neuhaus go in, embraced me 227 393
186 world to ‘lay waste with fire’ (he quoted from 228 394
187 the actor asked him: ‘Iosif Vissarionovich, how 229 396
188 present, wanted to know whether Shakespeare, Ibsen and 230 397
189 years of my childhood; the lure of books added to my desire 231 398
190 some of her poems, spoke about her to me as someone not 232 400
191 became louder and the world ‘Isaiah’ could be 233 402
192 departure and to apologise for it. I asked if I might be 234 403
193 who had done a great deal to form her – he had thought 235 405
194 that many-faceted and most magical poem and its deeply 236–7 406
195 It was, I think, by now about three in the morning. She 238 407
196 that. The morality of Anna Karenina is the morality 239 408
197 express a wish to be with her; and then he would come, 240 410
198 and Verlaine and Rimbaud and Verhaeren, whom they all knew 241 411
199 outside itself. Again she spoke of pre-revolutionary St 242 412
200 This was of little consequence; it was true that 243 414
201 wife and me, that he thought my wife delightful, and told 244 416
202 spies,’ he remarked (so it is alleged), and followed 245 418
203 Theatre – Siegfried Sassoon – have any political 246 419
204 ‘believe me, Pasternak and I and Mandel’shtam 247 421
205 about her poetry, but the letters were about himself, 248 422
206 war, when they were both being evacuated to cities in 249 424
207 should be slowly poisoned, then countermanded them; 250 426
208 this could not fail to act as a powerful stimulus to 251 427
209 Some of the passages relevant to the ‘Guest from the 253 428
210 From an Italian Diary (Iz italyanskogo dnevnika) 254 431

          First line (1998) 1998 US 2014
Yitzhak Sadeh is today chiefly known as one of 78 252
developed a fantatical passion for physical 79 254
meeting painters and scultptors and other free spirits 80 255
was not legally necessary for him to become a 81 256
He stormed round Petrograd in 1917, and probably 82 257
and writer on music, took part. Nabokov remembered 83 259
reception camp. They were kindly treated and he 84 260
where equality, fraternity and, one day, liberty 85 261
despite his lack of interest in her and complaints 86 262
heart of resistance, battling against alien rule. 87 264
there was a complete divorce the better – perhaps 88 265
His part in Israeli politics had exactly the same 89 266
elegance, half bohemian, half aristocratic, too 90 267
Lord David Cecil was born the second son of 160 273
unusual charm and ease of manner, intellectual gaiety 161 274
College, where he remained from 1924 until 1930. 162 276
creative process of the writer, the process of the 163 277
an earlier century (Two Quiet Lives, 1948) – and 164 278
She wrote of an England he knew and understood, 165 279
life. He shared his sense of Woolf’s dazzling genius 166 281
declared that he wrote with undeniable charm, style and 167 282
I remember that in 1933 Virginia Woolf was invited to 168 298
David Cecil has just published a lecture about him, God 169 300
‘I cannot go on talking like this, I am so sorry. 170 301
Virginia. I’ll never forget when you asked poor Hugh 171 302
I met Edmund Wilson, I think, sometime in the early 172 283
appalling effect which this had had upon him, for, 173 285
whether there were no academics he liked or admired 174 286
academics at lunch or dinner. I relieved his fears 175 287
during the First World War, and he found the appearance          176 288
him, that they had talked about the old times with great 177 290
think that he was, perhaps, below his angle of vision. 178 291
of the friendship that bound us. I knew that it was 179 292
Once he had formed a social and psychological 180 293
civilisation that would respond to new human needs 181 294–5
all Jews’ I sought unity and a metaphysically 182 296