Corrections to Liberty

The corrections in this list (all needed in the first impression) have been cumulatively made in subsequent impressions of the paperback edition, with the exception of those in this colour, which will be made in future impressions, and should be included in translations, which should be made from the latest impression (2013). Asterisked corrections need to be made only in translations. Listings are not provided for pp. ii and iv, which have been extensively changed on more than one occasion, or for the index, which has been revised throughout (though recently discovered errors on p. 388 do appear).

Page Line For Read
i 11 held the Presidency served as President
5–3 up several […] remaining two volumes. many other books by Berlin, including all those listed above, and a four-volume edition of his letters.

Ian Harris is Lecturer in Early Modern History at the University of Leicester. His ‘Isaiah Berlin: Two Concepts of Liberty’ appeared in Murray Forsyth and Maurice Keens-Soper (eds), The Political Classics: Green to Dworkin (1996).
vii 2 up 367 375
last 371 379
viii 5 xxxiv 2
xv 11 ever since ever since it was published
xvi, xvii, xix, xx [various] […]
xvi 12 Knapheis Knapheis (from 1967 Tolkien):
xix 3 reproduced on page 2 see page xxxiv below
xxii 2–8 break off quotation as at bottom of page: if this takes up more space, absorb this by reducing leading through page  
  16 were was
xxv 7 page numbers pages
xxviii 2 before him before him (see page 282 below)
xxx 19 warmly appreciative long and thoughtful
  note 1 London, 1946 New York, 1945; London, 1946
    p. 226. chapter 23, 2nd paragraph.
xxxiii 4 individual other
7 counsel) counsel) once more
Postscript Replace with new text: A series of revealing early drafts of ‘Two Concepts of Liberty’ were published in 2014. Some of these are online at <http://berlin.wolf.ox.ac.uk/published_works/tcl/>, and others constitute an appendix to the second edition of Berlin’s Freedom and Its Betrayal (Princeton, 2014). The much shorter text that Berlin delivered in Oxford in 1958 is an appendix to the second edition of Political Ideas in the Romantic Age (Princeton, 2014).
   The postscript to Ian Harris’s essay has been updated to include, among other recent publications, the new editions of eleven of Berlin’s books published by Princeton University Press in 2013–14,¹ and the last two volumes of Berlin’s selected letters. For a more detailed survey of recent literature, readers may consult George Crowder’s ‘After Berlin: The Literature since 2002’ at <http://berlin.wolf.ox.ac.uk/lists/onib/after-berlin.pdf>.
    The fourth impression of Liberty gave me the opportunity to add the source of the quotation ascribed by Berlin in ‘Historical Inevitability’ (on p. 125), in a somewhat inaccurate form (now corrected), to ‘a French writer’. I am very grateful to Anders Smith for telling me the origin of this elusive remark, for which I had been searching for many years.
   There was insufficient room in situ for three further missing references. The epigraph from Trotsky on p. 55 is a typical Berlinian ‘improvement’ of ‘Any contemporary of ours who wants peace and comfort before anything has chosen a bad time to be born’, from Leon Trotsky, ‘Hitler’s Victory’, Manchester Guardian, 22 March 1933, pp. 11–12 at p. 11, reprinted in Writings of Leon Trotsky (1932–33), ed. George Breitman and Sarah Lovell (New York, 1972), pp. 133–6 at p. 134; for the Russian original, ‘German Fascism in Power: Origins and Perspectives’ (10 March 1933), see e.g. <http://web.mit.edu/fjk/www/Trotsky/sochineniia/1933/19330310.html>. For Tout comprendre, c’est tout pardonner (p. 127) see <http://berlin.wolf.ox.ac.uk/queries/untracedquotations.html>, s.v. ‘anon.’. And ‘whose service is perfect freedom’ (p. 206) is from The Book of Common Prayer, the Order for Morning Prayer, the second collect, for peace.

H.H.
January 2017

¹ These books are listed in note 3 to p. 365 below. The new editions all appeared in 2013, apart from the second editions of Freedom and Its Betrayal and Political Ideas in the Romantic Age, and the third edition of Personal Impressions, which appeared in 2014.
xxxiv [new error in third impression] [move caption down to fall below illustration as in previous impressions]  
2 [insert image and caption from p. xxiv]
5–53 headline add letter-spacing between the F and the I in ‘FIVE  
6 note 1, 3 logic and logic and the
9 16 concept concepts
  17 has have
10 10 determinists, determinists
11 step, step
note 2, 2 Sydney Sidney
19 2–3 childish, or at any rate childlike, ‘childish, or at any rate childlike’, [and add note cue 1 after the second comma]
  12 12 [save line]
  [bottom of page] [insert new note 1:] op. cit. (p. 11 above, note 1), p. 39 (45).
20 4 [move note cue in line 4 to follow ‘interesting.’ in line 6]  
  2 up us’, us’;
  note 1 [replace with:] ‘If the truth should be complex and somewhat disillusioning, it would still not be a merit to substitute for it some more dramatic and comforting simplicity.’ C. I. Lewis, Mind and the World-Order: Outline of a Theory of Knowledge (New York, 1929), p. 339.
21 6 nor or
28 note 1 below]. below, pp. 252–79].
31 note 2, 3 Warner Werner
33 note 1 below. below, pp. 287–321.
35 4 up both in in both
36 note 1, 3 jr Jr
39 6 up first second
  4 up second first
51 7 nichts – nichts,
note 1, 1–4 [replace whole note with:] Torquato Tasso in Ernst Raupach, Tasso’s Tod: Trauerspiel in fünf Aufzügen (Hamburg, 1835), act 1, scene 3, p. 56.
53 last that much power that too much power
55 4 correct double-struck ‘g’ in ‘Hegelian’  
note 1 [replace with:] See p. xxxiv above.
67 1 Leontiev Leont'ev
70 continuation of note, 4 party’ (Cries […] person?) ‘Yes party [Cries […] person?] Yes
75 8 ideas, ideas
82 10 up has have
92 8 ‘out ‘Out
12 up point pas trop
note 2 [replace with:] ‘Above all, gentlemen, not too much zeal.’ This maxim is attributed to Talleyrand in various forms. The earliest published citation of this version known to us is ‘Surtout pas trop de zèle’ (‘Above all, not too much zeal’) in ‘Bien mal acquis ne profite jamais’ (by ‘Marcant’), Revue de Marseille et de Provence 5 no. 7 (July 1859), 335. An earlier version is ‘N’ayez pas de zèle’ (‘Don’t be zealous’), in C.-A. Sainte-Beuve, ‘Madame de Staël’ (1835): Sainte-Beuve, Oeuvres, ed. Maxime Leroy ([Paris], 1949–51), ii 1104; ‘point de zèle’ (‘no zeal at all’) is also found.
95 8 teaching and his influence. teaching.
98 12 the motives motives
107 1 the pattern, the the pattern, the
19 whole whole,
13 up time-honoured view time-honoured, view,
111 note 1, 1 progres progrès
114 21 only be grasped be grasped only
116 note 1, 3 voluntary voluntary and involuntary
118 11 casual causal
121 3 up [begin new paragraph at ‘We may’]
122 4–5 [run on: no new paragraph]
125 19–20 ‘Je ne propose rien […] j’expose,’ ‘[J]e n’impose rien, je ne propose même rien: j’expose,’[note cue 1]
  note 1 See p. xxxiii above. ‘I insist on nothing; I assert nothing: I exhibit.’ Charles Dunoyer, De la liberté du travail (Paris, 1845), vol. 1, p. 18.
127 11 , but not by them, by – not by them, but by
* 18 up ner ner[note cue 1]
* [bottom of page] [insert new note 1:] For this saying see <http://berlin.wolf.ox.ac.uk/queries/untracedquotations.html>, s.v. ‘anon.’.
129 note 1 pp. 183–4. p. 227.
153 8 so, objective,
166 note 1 1957. 1957. Ed.
170 12 due not due
173 note 1 1: p. 318 in op. cit. (p. 1, ‘De la souveraineté du peuple’: p. 318 in Écrits politiques (see p.
181 15 fact, and fact,
182 note 1, 4 §24 § 24
183 4 up despotism despotism
184 5 up conditioning,² is conditioning² are
185 1 heart of heart of the
18 slave owner slave-owner
187 17 concept of it concept of freedom
196 7–6 up [run on: no new paragraph]
6 up optimism, and optimism and,
197 23 August Auguste
203 7 despotism despotism
*206 5 up [add new note cue 1 after ‘freedom’ ’]  
*   [add new note 1:] The Book of Common Prayer, the Order for Morning Prayer, the second Collect, for Peace.
207 10 a the
15 up for in
208 21 up for for the
19 up Frenchmen Frenchmen,
209 3 up more mere
note 3 p. 3 p. 173
210 note 1 ibid., op. cit. (p. 173 above, note 1),
7 up by being by
214 4 assurance an assurance
219 14 The On the
19 essay, essay
223 2 up apostates, the apostates and
224 10 speech: speech;
227 19 up worship) worship),
228 note 3, 7 (on p. 229) Marx) appears Marx) – appears
229 14 for without conviction, for
230 note 1, 7–8 1978: Oxford University Press) 1978)
note 1, 7 up 7.125 7. 125
233 15 towards it towards truth
note 1, 1 Aereopagita Areopagita
235 7 it is truth is
note 1 ‘a contemporary […] Robson. [Arthur Helps], Thoughts in the Cloister and the Crowd ([London], 1835), p. 2, where it is italicised.
236 note 2 F/233–4. F/223–4.
241 11 can alone alone can
242 12 lecture in this series, own essay on toleration,
244 13 up or Condorcet of Condorcet
251 note 1, 4 not merely in view in view not merely
252 14 denied defined
268 5 freewill free will
293 13 up century century BC
315 15 up fatal fatal,
331 2 Russia Russia,
338 12 Leontiev Leont'ev
340 4 son [previously ‘Son’] son,
341 8 would could
343 7 up Deutschtom Deutschtum
345 note 1 puissons puissions
351 note 6 See pp. See
352 note 1 note 1 p. 345 above. 345.
353 note 12 Journal Review
355 4 Jr. Jr
357 10 Kukuthas Kukathas
358 2 Sandra Sondra
359 note 4 See p. See
360 note 11 See p.  See
364 5 up form (see opposite) on form on
    [delete last line of main text]  
note 14, 2 [add at end:] [It does not appear in the second edition.]
365 ff.   [substitute revised postscript]  
367 [now 375] 6 subheadings headings
  5–7 move parenthesis to follow ‘opening words’  
368 note 10, 1 4 8
371 ff. [now 379 ff.] Replace index with new thoroughly revised version
388 Plekhanov [take back ‘130’]
Protagoras [insert new entry above:] proportional representation, 224
representation 3 63
democracy democracy; proportional representation