Concordance to Karl Marx

compiled by Nick Hall

Karl Marx was first published in 1939. Since then, four further editions have been published, most recently the 2013 (fifth) edition published by Princeton University Press, the first to be edited by Henry Hardy. Each new edition apart from the second and the fifth introduced additions to the original text, and all new editions apart from the second included corrections; references for Berlin’s quotations were added in the fifth edition. A table of the chief textual additions can be found here. The concordance does not include the 2013 Editor’s Preface, the Afterword or the new Guide to Further Reading.

1939     First line (1939) 1948  1963  1978  2013 
6 My thanks are due to my friends and viii viii x xxxv
[1963] I have taken the opportunity viii x xxxiii
[1978] I wrote this book almost forty years vii xxix
[1978] added a good deal to knowledge and viii xxx
[1978] allied to, indeed, identical with, ix xxxi
[1978] to thank my friend Mr Francis Graham x xxxii
9 No thinker in the nineteenth 1 1 1 1
10 general public, and while towards 2 2 1 2
11 the vision in his imagination. 3 3 2 3
12 [be]haved with open suspicion 4 4 3 4
13 [exist]ing powers was morally 5 5 4 5
14 [con]templated in isolation 6 6 4 6
15 to refute falsehood. Destruam 7 7 5 7
16 opposition to the bourgeoisie 8 8 6 8
17 everyone may yet make it possible 9 9 7 9
18 must ceaselessly be taught that 11 10–11 8 10
19 virtue or institution; it revealed 12 12 9 11
20 which works of art are original, when 13 13 9 12
21 a treatise by Holbach printed 14 14 10 14
22 or intellectual power – the great 15 15 11 15
23 broke through the framework which 16 16 12 16
24 the library of the British Museum 17 17 12 17
25 calculated to irritate public opinion 18 18 13 18
26 clear, passionately held principle 19 19 14 19
27 [ill]ness, put off its publication 21 20 15 20
28 civilization or an idealized past 22 22 15 21
29 Chapter II Childhood and Adolescence 23 23 17 22
30 more divided into feudally organized 24 24 17 23
31 of rigid supervision over all departments 25 25 18 24
32 part still continued to live, or 26 26 19 24
33 Karl. The hostility of the latter 27 27 20 25
34 and political reforms worthy of a wise 28 28 20 26
35 Marx believed with Condorcet that 29 29 21 27
36 thinker, emotionalism, belief in supernatural 30 30 22 29
37 earnest tone of his essays on moral and 31 31 23 30
39 one tactless or insulting act might 32–332 24 31
39 comparatively provincial: Trier was 34 34 24 32
40 Chapter III The Philosophy of Spirit 35 35 27 33
41 century, Bentham and the philosophical 36 36 27 34
42 [ex]perience and reason, properly 37 37 28 35
43 But here a new obstacle arises: whereas 38 38 29 36
44 irrational element, some simple failure 39 39 30 37
45 [imagin]ation, to conceive ideal 40 40 30 38
46 sceptics, materialists, rationalists 41 41 31 39
47 prophets. He was a preacher and a propagandist 42 42 32 39
48 in the middle of the nineteenth century 43 43 33 41
49 metaphysical view of nature and of 44 44 33 42
50 it must be no less possible to find out 46 46 34 43
51 [de]veloped state, those very tendencies 47 47 35 44
52 that seemed to Hegel to be the sphere to which 48 48 36 45
53 the uniform, monotonous history of 49 49 37 46
54 for that very reason be identical 50 50 37–8 47
55 [influ]ence our mental portrait of 51 51 38 48
56 fruitful and the sterile, the dying 52 53 39 49
57 institutions, viewed as great collective 53 54 40 50
58 and destruction in the world. He declared 54 55 41 51
59 major transition is marked by a large 56 56 42 52
60 be made to vanish overnight by the 57 57 42 53
61 Spirit approaches its perfection 58 59 43 54
62 [there]fore far more truly a revolution 59 60 44 55
63 spirit purely Hegelian. His early training 60 61 45 56
64 Chapter IV The Young Hegelians 61 62 47 57
65 [en]tirely suppress – the growing class 62 63 47 58
66 rational, declared that the measure of 63 64 48 59
67 and the more enlightened the critic, the more 64 65 49 60
68 [dis]position to support the existing order 65 66 50 61
69 survive. The University of Berlin was the chief 66 67 51 62
70 every type of philosophy of history. 67 68 51 63
71 Lutheran charging him with atheism and subversion 68 69 52 64
72 of unexampled proportions ... a revolution 69 71 53 65
73 financially depended, died, leaving a barely 70 72 54 66
74 Voltaire, Holbach, Lessing, Heine and Hegel 72 73 54 67
75 [through]out Germany, and the Government 73 74 55 68
76 the dominant partner in the Russo-Prussian 74 75 56 69
77 met with in the history of thought 75 76 57 70
78 world, capable of effecting this or 76 77 57 71
79 forces by enabling him to adapt 77 78 58 72
80 She loved, admired, and trusted him 78 80 59 73
81 greater men, such as Marx and Bakunin, with 79 81 60 74
82 Chapter V Paris 81 82 61 76
83 [per]sonality, produced an exhilarating 82 83 61 77
84 [ruth]less corruption, in which vast sudden 83 84 62 78
85 [spacious]ness, room in which to move 84 85 63 79
86 made overnight wholly rational and wholly good 85 86 64 80
87 hypotheses, attracted Marx and strengthened 86 87 64 81
88 intellectual discomfort. Such tolerance 87 88 65 82
89 monarchs to secure his own and other’s 88 89 66 83
90 of circumstances favours them, they eventually 89 90 67 84
91 consequence that priests, soldiers, rentiers 91 92 68 85
92 This belief was not so naïve then 92 93 68 86
93 the predestined saviours of society 93 94 69 87
94 moments remains elaborate and precise: 94 95 70 88
95 socialist demands of Marrast or Ledru Rollin 95 96 71 89
96 prophecy. The more idealistic Fourierists founded 96 97 71 90
97 question. Bauer declared that the Jews, lagging 97 99 73 91
98 new movement and a new outlook, and to have 98 100 73 92
99 the majority of whom were simple and self-educated men 100 101 74 93
100 applicability of the discoveries of others 101 102 75 95
101 [through]out the greater part of his life 102 104 76 96
102 aimless wandering in the intricate maze 103 105 76–7 96
103 [controver]sialist, applying to everything 104 106 77 97
104 [govern]ment. He had a generous, extravagant, 105 107 78 98
105 of the oppressed, he built on this alone 106 108 79 99–100
106 he had already condemned Stirner: but 107 109 80 100
107 uneasily for some years, saved from complete 109 110 80 102
108 artisans, and made him, for a brief period a 110 111 81 103
109 however, he became convinced that Proudhon’s 111 113 82 104
110 views. Early in life he held that all property was 112 114 83 105
111 deliberate policy of those who feared its 113 115 83–4 106
112 [maladjust]ments of an unplanned society 114 116 84 107
113 pronounced its fallacious and superficial 115 117 85 108
114 it has reached. This is followed by a 117 118 86 109
115 they are the historical product. In a 118 119 87 110
116 small farmers, artisans, professional men 119 120 87 111
117 Chapter VI Historical Materialism 121 122 89 112
118 philosophical theory which explains everything 122 123 90 113
119 [succes]sion of whose states history consists 123 124 90–1 114
120 all generalized abstractions no less empty 124 125–6 91 115–6
121 [con]flict arises? Hegel had declared that they 125 127 92 117
122 and actions of those who lack them: until they 126 132 96 121
123 the economic foundation the whole vast 127 133 97 122–3
124 of the tension which persists between them 128 134 98 124
125 the needs, to explain away which they were 129 135 98 124
126 the agonized cry of a persecuted neurotic 138 144 106 135
127 actual situation; but placing ideals before 139 145 107 136
128 classes, to deprive the bourgeoisie of its power 140 146 108 137
129 were by the social, that is economic, situation 141 147 108 138
130 the whole attention of the sufferer 142 149 109 139
131 the workers spread error and delusion 143 150 110 140
132 course of its long wandering in the desert 144 151 111 141
133 above itself to shake off the yoke of the 146 152 112 142
134 may be, but what it is compelled to 147 153 112 143
135 since causes which may appear lost may, in fact, 148 155 113 144
136 it or not; if you do not, if you fight it 149 156 114 145
137 Hegelian thought. But it is not guilty of Hegel’s 150 157 115 146
138 forgotten in our day as they deserve to be 151 158 116 147
139 Chapter VII 1848 152 159 117 148
140 cities. He entered into relations with Belgian 153 160 117 150
141 general attitude of European society 154 161 118 151
142 political allies. They had affiliated their society 155 162 119 152
143 indulging in vague and exuberant eloquence 156 163 120 153
144 the name of the avenging forces of the future, 157 164 120 154
145 by writs and charters, it has created freedom 158 165 121 155
146 ideologists of peasants, artisans, small traders 159 166 122 155
147 intensification of production, the destruction 160 167 123 156
148 No summary can convey the quality of 161 169 124 158
149 received with enthusiasm and credulity 163 170 124 159
150 was there largely instrumental in persuading 164 171 125 160
151 ill to overlook the claims of the bourgeoisie 165 172 126 161
152 opposition to a power whose entire 166 173 127 162
153 [parlia]mentary liberals, but principally 167 174 127 162
154 threw up barricades, and after three days’ 168 175 128 163
155 enemy of its enemies, the common enemy 169 176 129 164
156 a speech of great length and erudition 170 177 130 165
157 Marx, who was by this time a figure of 171 178 131 166
158 Chapter VIII Exile in London: The First 173 180 133 168
159 nightmare of 1849, the very distance from 174 181 133 169
160 many of them were. Marx, who did not 175 182 134 170
161 The moment at which Marx arrived in England 176 183 135 171
162 it was, nothing happened. It may have been 177 184 136 171
163 of refugees, and quarrelling endlessly 178 185 136 172
164 immediate situation, able to guide 179 186 137 173
165 it, at any rate in practice, in vital 180 187 138 175
166 ally, convinced him that a compact with 181 188 139 175
167 offered a curious commentary on this 182 189 139 176
168 [gather]ings fulfil the double function 184 191 140 177
169 reprinted under the title The 185 192 141 178
170 to support Marx, materially and 186 193 142 179
171 and manage to make out certain objects 187 194 143 180
172 of work at night, accompanied by ceaseless 188 195 143 182
173 Christian Socialists. During these years 189 196 144 183
174 bitterly as on the first day. My wife 190 197 145 184
175 anti-slavery, free trade policy, while in 191 198 146 186
176 revolution of 1848 was nurtured in the economic 192 199 146 187
177 the material conditions for the realization 193 200 147 188
178 of the southern states of America treated 195 202 148 189
179 ever, a connoisseur of political skill in all 196 203 149 190
180 published as pamphlets. The most peculiar 197 204 149 191
181 please Marx entirely, but he needed allies, 198 205 150 192
182 journalism they were far in advance of their time 199 206 151 193
183 to a classless society.’ On these 200 207 152 194
184 was tried and imprisoned. During the years 201 208 152 195
185 of him politically. He disliked his ostentation, his 202 209 153 196
186 by his gay patter and easy extravagance, spending 203 210 154 197
187 to be organized or financed by the state 205 212 155 197
188 Lassalle’s beliefs and acts, particularly 206 213 155 198
189 doctrine of personal dictatorship 207 214 156 199
190 in which he normally lived. He suddenly 208 215 157 200
191 his personal feelings there was genuine 209 216 158 201
192 compositors and staff of The People’s 210 217 158 202
193 [move]ment in Europe, the fanatical 211 218 159 203
194 Chapter IX The International 213 220 161 205
195 the capitalist enemy to terms by sheer 214 221 162 206
196 came to England, half tourists, half representatives 215 222 162 207
197 will between the classes. The meeting resolved 216 223 163 208
198 countries. A formal request was thereupon made 217 224 164 209
199 legal limitation of the working day not entirely 218 225 164 210
200 [econo]mic structure of society which, in spite 219 226 165 211
201 higher wages, shorter hours and political 220 227 166 212
202 serious rivals in the organization, being 221 228 167 213
203 appearance were unlikely to produce a favourable 222 229 167 214
204 attended the meetings of the General Council 224 231 168 215
205 federal autonomy. This was a heresy which even 225 232 169 216
206 [salva]tion of society – quite logically 226 233 170 217
207 unions because he believed that this was 227 234 170 218
208 and martyrs, but crushed only too easily by 228 235 171 219
209 Chapter X "The Red Terror Doctor" 229 236 173 220
210 societies which if they were ever real 230 237 173 221
211 enterprise, or to accident of fortune 231 238 175 222
212 organizer and manager of the processes of 232 239 175 223
213 over them gives those who have it the power 233 240 176 224
214 and transport secured by the pooling of 234 242 178 226
215 the bourgeoisie, which forms an 235 244 179 228
216 of the first volume he declared: ‘While 236 245 179–80 229
217 The publication of Das Kapital 237 246 181 230
218 He wished to dedicate his book to Darwin 239 247 181 231
219 international communism’ might be seen 240 249 182 232
220 and letters, but published nothing that was 241 250 183 233
221 French, English, Russian, Italian: 242 251 184 235
222 of the French and German proletariat 243 252 184–5 235–6
223 and pro-German, under the influence 244 253 185 236
224 [com]mittee of the people as the true 245 254 186 238
225 that the state in its old form was abolished 246 255 187 239
226 [associa&]tion with a body which, in the 247 256 187 240
227 revolution. The Commune was the first spontaneous 249 258 189 241
228 hastened its ultimate dissolution 250 259 189 242
229 members were peaceful men, solely occupied 251 260 190 243
230 ‘in order to replace the socialist and semi-socialist 252 261 191 244
231 scruple he found irresistible. Nechayev, who 253 262 192 245
232 becoming formidable; in Germany, the government 254 263 192 246
233 Chapter XI Last Years 256 265 194 248
234 less terminology inherited from Lassalle and the 257 266 194 249
235 of the dialectical principle far beyond 258 267 196 250
236 He had moved from Kentish Town first to 259 268 197 251
237 which he was unable to avoid pointing out 260 269 198 252
238 clodhoppers’ into admiration for the new 261 270 199 253
239 masses, hatred and scorn of art or life 262 271 199 254
240 To his own surprise Marx found that the nation 263 273 200 255
241 distaste: he had an incurable aversion to everything 264 274 201 256
242 this most bourgeois of lands would seem 265 275 202 257
243 effort, and I felt that many a long year 267 276 203 258
244 bookshelves was a leather-coloured sofa on 268 277 203 259
245 whose close association with Heine had 269 278 204 260–1
246 end of his life his appetite increased to a degree 270 279 205 262
247 an armchair in his study. He was buried 271 280 206 262
248 and cynical society into which he was born 272 282 206 264
249 proceeds upon a different basis. The doctrine 273 283 207 265