Concordance to The Hedgehog and the Fox

Nick Hall

The second edition (2013) has been completely reset and repaginated. The text has also been revised throughout, and added to. So this edition should be used in all new and revised translations. A number of different versions of the first edition have appeared over the years, sometimes with different pagination. This will cause some inconvenience to readers trying to follow up references to those earlier editions. This concordance facilitates the conversion of page references to one edition into references to another.

Abridged
1953 First line (1953) US 1957 US 1978 RT1 1978 1996 PSM 1997 RT2 20082/e 2013
1 There is a line 7 3 22 1 436 24 1
2 sometimes self-contradictory 8 3 22 2 437 25 2
3 find it useful or enjoyable 9 4 23 3 437 25 3
4 to offer is that Tolstoy 11 5 24 5 438 26 4
5 treated Tolstoy primarily 13 6 24–5 6 439 27 5
6 Belinsky’s intimate friend 14 7 25 8 440 28 6
7 swamp’; others for the most part 15 8 26 9 440 29 8
8 thought; and even so much 17 9 27 11 441 30 9
9 interest in history and the problem 18 10 28 12 442 31 10
10 sympathetic critics - surely 20 11 28 14 443 32 11
11 of what he was doing 21 12 29 15 444 33 12
12 voprosy’ became fused 23 13 30 17 444 33 13
13 which has lost its proper aim’. 24 14 31 18 445 34 14
14 history could (and should) 25 15 31 19 446 35 15
15 history - that no matter how 27 16 32 21 447 36 16
16 be recollected by the actors 28 17 33 22 448 37 18
17 then gradually becomes convinced 30 18 34 24 448 38 19
18 responsible’. And this because 31 19 34 25 449 38 20
19 the vast multiplicity of minute 32–3 20 35 26–7 450 39 21
20 a century later levelled against 34 21 36 28 451 40 22
21 false. He had no doubt 35 22 36 29 451 41 23
22 writing books. By the end 37 23 37 31 452 42 24
23 in Vienna, and by means of such talk 38 24 38 33 453 43 25
24 introduced, but the spectacle 39–40 25 39 34 454 44 27
25 it may be relevant to what should 41 26 40 36 455 44–5 28
26 later actually occurred; whereas 42 27 40 37 455 45 29
27 human acts to the circumstances 44 28 41 38 456 46 30
28 ram whom the shepherd is fattening 45 29 42 40 457 47 31
29 emotional atmosphere for which 47 30 43 41 458 48 32
30 And yet the primacy of these 48 31 43 43 458 49 33
31 section. How would an ideal historical 50 32 44 44 459 49 34
32 seek to subvert such common-sense 51 33 45 45 460 50 35
33 own conscious life ‘for itself’ 52 34 46 47 461 51 36
34 we were allowed to ask what 54 35 46 48 461 52 37
35 themselves, particularly the ‘great’ 55 36 47 50 462 53 38
36 to blow away. The Russian critic 57 37 48 51 463 53–4 39
37 composed the furniture of the world 58 38 48 53 464 54 40
38 for some edifice strong enough 60 39 49 54 464 55 41
39 students of art and literature 61 40 50 55 465 56 42
40 persons and things and situations 62–3 41 51 57 466 57 43–4
41 in terms of one another by some 64 42 51 58 466–7 57 45
42 coherent outlook and a single vision 65 43 52 60 467 58 46
43 of Rousseau, and late in life 67 44 53 468 59 47
44 and Peace, and certainly 68 45 54 469 60 48
45 But although Tolstoy and the 70 46 54 469 61 49
46 realistic Tolstoy of middle years 71 46 55 470 62 50
47 the consequent desirability 73 47 56 471 62 51
48 Nikolai had spoken to him 74 48 56 472 63 52
49 the last years of the eighteenth 76 49 57 472 64 53
50 information about the life 77 50 58 473 65 54
51 meeting of Napoleon with the 79 51 59 474 66 55
52 the irrational, precisely because 80 52 59 475 67 56
53 et qui semble s’ébranler sous les 81 53 60 476 68 58
54 And finally: ‘C’est l’opinion’ 83 54 61 477 69 59
55 the naïve explanations provided 84 55 62 478 70 61
56 or of the French from Russia 85 56 63 479 71 62
57 theorists seemed so resolutely to be 87 57 63 480 72 63
58 Both dismiss any interpretation 88 58 64 480 73 64
59 oddly similar outlooks 90 59 65 481 73 65
60 it to be mysterious and divine 91 60 66 482 74 66
61 Jesuits; they would at least inculcate 92 61 66 483 75 67
62 same sardonic, almost cynical, disbelief 94 62 67 483 76 68
63 principle concerning knowledge of the 95 63 68 484 77 69
64 deaf to the true Word of God 97 64 68 485 77 70
65 know the causal network in its infinite 98 65 69 485 78 71
66 and the military experts and experts 100 66 70 486 79 72
67 intended to see that these ‘heroes’ 101 67 70 487 80 73
68 (Tolstoy and Maistre, and many 103 68 71 488 81 74
69 least by us) unalterable medium 104 69 72 489 81 75–6
70 reasoning that makes them masters 106 70 73 489 82 77
71 themselves acquire their meanings 107 71 73 490 83 78
72 VII We are part of a larger scheme 109 72 74 491 84 79
73 (as opposed to the teachings of the 110 72 75 492 85 80
74 conception are limited by the fact that 112 73 75 492 86 81
75 which we conceive and describe 113 74 76 493 86 82
76 of the varieties of experience 114–1575 77 494 87 83
77 has occurred and changed us all 116 76 78 495 88 84
78 directions - and all this because they 117 77 78 495 89 85
79 true knowledge - wisdom - lies in 119 78 79 496 90 86
80 and indeed often incompatible 120 79 80 497 90 87–8
81 citadel of his own variety 122 80 80 498 91 89
82 family, by devoted followers, by the 124 81 81 61 498 92 90