Concordance to Three Critics of the Enlightenment

compiled by Nick Hall

The concordance collates the first editions of Vico & Herder (1976) and The Magus of the North (1993) with the first and second editions of Three Critics of the Enlightenment (2000 and 2013 respectively). The text of the second edition, which has been revised throughout, and added to, should be used in all new and revised translations. The concordance does not include the 2013 foreword or appendix.

Vico & Herder (1976)  Magus of the North (1993)    First line   TCE 2000  US TCE 2013 
Between 1960 and 1971 a somewhat vii xix
reappear, though I was able to publish viii xx
reflect, if less perspicuously, the ix xxi
problematic, sometimes fruitless, x xxiii
xi The essays in this book originate 3 5
xiii Historians are concerned with the 5 7
xiv [examinat]tion of the entire 6 8
xv above all, Fausto Nicolini, have done 7 9
xvi mean, nevertheless derives from his 8 10
xvii of external nature, which, since 9 12
xviii fortuitous nor mechanically determined 10 13
xix what they lived by, which can be 11 14
xx work lay unheeded, save among 12 15
xxi a new science: that is, general 13 16’17
xxii he originated and gave life and 14 18
xxiii and blindly gave marks to all 15 19
xxiv altogether modern. The ancient 16 20
xxv convoluted and obscure terminology 17 22
xvi individual social wholes, intelligible 18 23
xvii rational methods of reconstruction of 19 24
3 Vico’s life and fate is perhaps the 21 26
4 fully recognized for what it is even 22 27
5 experience – the reward is great. Few23 29
6 [exceed]ingly anxious to disclaim 24 30
7 Vico cut out the entire ‘negative’ 25 31
8 daughters was diseased from birth 26 32
9 comparatively little trace upon his 27 34
10 so clear and so distinct that they 28 35
11 this. His Catholic piety alone was 29 36
12 qualitative distinctions – ‘inner’30 37
13 its elements or contemplates the 31 39
14 of literally nothing, can we be said 32 40
15 proposition in his Apologia 34 42
16 whether the eminent persons present 35 44
17 material (in this case, the symbols 36 44
18 radical move is still to come. At 37 46
19 be of verum – of what can 38 47
20 demonstration of what the causes be 39 48
21 knowledge. Vico is not a sceptic nor an 40 49’50
22 order, but also why what is, or occurs 41 51
23 French historiography in the sixteenth 42 52
24 exist a region in which anthropomophism 43 54
25 Italian thinkers. In 1452 Gianozzo Manetti 44 55
26 with it. ‘Create the truth which you 45 56
27 begetter, in a famous passage in the 46 57
28 but it has in it something of the 47 59
29 inductive or experimental, perceptual 48 60
30 all. ‘It is beyond our power to 49 61
31 so – he does not claim to know the 50 63
32 recognition of authority, of what it is 51 64
33 A sense of historical perspective – for 53 65
34 [blind]ness vitiated their work and 54 66
35 and society alike, phase follows phase 55 68
36 in the apparent chaos – an Ariadne’s 56 69
37 they are’, is regarded by him as the 57 70
38 human nature, in the course of seeking 58 72
39 Are we seriously to suppose that ‘the 59 73
40 example, which dominated his own age, 60 74
41 life which we speak of as the character 61 75–6
42 Men embody their feelings, attitudes, and 62 77
43 not by the children of its old age 63 78
44 occur in them, are ‘imaginative universals’ 64 79
45 Jove’. Hence sprang divination, ‘the 65 81
46 precedes – and must precede – the 66 82
47 must be deeply and systematically different 67 83
48 the flights of birds, symbols which the 68 84
49 story of the societies in which they were 69 86
50 to interpret it, but it is not a path 70 87
51 so in primitive societies such important 71 88
52 within; and, so he believed, can see 72 89
53 categories, ‘to enter the vast imaginations 73 91
54 kind of society, he asks again and again, 74 92
55 hand, has quite a different, and a logically 75 93
56 Some of Vico’s ideas are patently 76 95
57 is most correctly interpreted as an 77 96
58 psychology, undisciplined fancy, and 79 97
59 time, by the human tendency to forget 80 99
60 frightening powers; ritual and rigid forms 81 100
61 the slaves revolted, demanded recognition, 82 101
62 maintain and protect their form of life. 83 103
63 remedy: it is repressed either by a 84 104
64 world, was dominated by priests, and in due 85 105
65 and, who knows, to what sublimer heights 86 107
66 ‘gentile’ societies), for it alone is what 87 108
67 what it is and not otherwise: 88* 109
68 has tempted so many later writers to 89 110
69 [struc]tures which are parts of the 90 112
70 the embodiment of infallible rules which 91 113
71 as fully rational until they have attained 92 114
72 thought and that of the progressive 93 115
73 Sanctis, or a Georg Hegel, or a Barthold 94 117
74 societies nevertheless constitute links 95 118
75 would be said again by Helvétius and 96 119
76 Providence disposes; man is free but 98 121
77 – the faith of Condorcet or Saint- 98 122
78 timeless values, and its historicism is 99 123
79 non-conformist, is probably correct. ‘Vico100 124
80 social bond, alone humanizes and 101 125
81 and do not create themselves. An 102 127
82 intentions’, ‘the human mind of 103 128
83 created the whole of human history, 104 129
84 his work sank after his death. In 105 131
85 these are not objective truths waiting to 106 132
86 of general ideas, unable to conceive their 107–08 133
87 were as certain as those of mathematics 109 134–5
88 fictions, as an art or game like chess 110 136
89 [histori]cal archaeology, philology, as 111 137
90 Did anyone read Vico? Does anyone do so 112 139
91 seems to me to contain a sibylline vision 113 140
92 the book, and both he and Baader thought 114 141
93 inasmuch as each obeys its own specific 115 143
94 founder of the metaphysics of history 116 144
95 city, which sprang from the passionate 117 145
96 mental activity and render its problems 118 147
97 persons, groups, institutions, and 119 148
98 dark. Nor did he invent, as he supposed 120–1 149
99 One of the central theses of the 122 151
100 how it is to be attempted. Yet without 123 152
101 [emin]ence on which Descartes had placed 124 153
102 the ‘Age of the Gods’ – to the 125 154
103 hopes, ambitions, imaginative experience – 126 156
104 the current. The seventeenth century is a time 127 157
105 [em]bellishment, nor a repository 128 158
106 of knowledge, e.g. for the Jews and, a 129 160
107 active beings – which seemed to him to 130 161
108 be said to know what it is to be poor, 131 162
109 experience, independent of concepts and 132 163
110 ‘ferine’ sensations to the beginnings of critical 133 165
111 bodies – indeed the whole part of physical 134 166
112 assimilated to, his purposive, ‘spiritual’ 135 167
113 undoubtedly hold that there exists a 136 169
114 idealists and Marxists who also struggled with 137 170
115 matter – a kind of vulgar atomism – 138 171
116 says that whereas Herder’s ideas were clearly 139 173
117 man, because he is made in God‘s image, has 140 174
118 of autonomous cultures, entire ways of 141 175
119 and animals ultimately differ only in 142 176
120 in identifying, but in distinguishing 143–4 178
121 they stood close to Bacon. But Vico’s 145 179
122 the centre of Vico’s vision – his 146 180
123 social progressive, an ally of the Royal 147 182
124 constantly returns. He was immersed in the 148 183
125 [con]ception goes well beyond the rise, 149 184
126 and their successors (sadly affected as these 150 185
127 In the first place, the very process of 151 187
128 but to a historicist attitude: to looking 152 188
129 consequently, they could always know, and 153 189
130 rigorous as the methods of medicine or 154 190
131 in one single great volume. Law 155 192
132 history, antipathy to timeless principles, 156 193
133 France, about the credentials of texts or 157 194
134 or Platonists and neo-Platonists of the 158 196
135 do with the laws of a society long dead 159 197
136 de passion is apt to affect them, 160 198
137 consequence of human structures, can be 161 200
138 that the surest path to such understanding 162 201
139 No doubt the discovery of the native 163 202
140 neither with strict Thomism, nor with the 165 203
141 work has been forgotten, what remains is the 166 205
142 their birth in certain times and in 167 206
143 Herder and the Enlightenment 168 208
144
145 Herder’s fame rests on the fact that he is 168 208
146 principle would be capable of answering 169 209
147 which have had great influence for two 170 210
148 Vico’s devoted admirer, Count Pietro Calepio; 171 211
149 [con]temptuous dismissal of the Dark Ages by 172 212
150 life. This is no less true of Burke, who 173 214
151 the Battle of the Ancients and the Moderns. 174 215
152 total break with the party of the 175 216
153 To return to the three topics of this 176 218
154 still more that of differences in unity, 177 219
155 and practice, ‘is’ and ‘ought’, intellectual 178 220
156 writer he is exuberant and disordered, but 179 221
157 by Napoleon on the German armies and 180 223
158 of abominable fratricide’. A year later 181 224
159 Frederick the Great and his French advisers, 182 225
160 peoples under one sceptre’), 183 227
161 should be called not the wisest, but 184 228
162 the domination of one man over another 185 229
163 What then is the right life for men? 186 230
164 duty, the moral equality of men, and 187 232
165 springs of life are mysterious, hidden 188 233
166 not think, as it were, in thoughts 189 234
167 allowing his entire being – spirit and 190 236
168 as God had given man a nature capable of 191 237
169 who, acquiring some terms by ‘natural’ means 192 238
170 verbs – connected with action – 193 239
171 had to be a direct gift of God, and not 194 241
172 everyone portrays himself and appears as he 196 242
173 no inkling of this: consider the translation 196 243
174 of the Enlightenment at its most naïve 197 244
175 [ob]served contingencies out of which Spinoza and 199 246
176 while evil has many faces; there is one true 200 247–8
177 constitutes all movement and growth – flow 201 249
178 opponents of the French lumières202 250
179 Karl Friedrich von Moser, begins that lament 203 251–2
180 cravings, to collective desires that seek 204 253
181 realize that Herder’s nationalism was never 205 254
182 Volkes and the more empirical 206 255
183 in nationality but in cultures, in worlds, 207 256
184 but believes in ‘grass roots’ – Russian 208 258
185 [senti]mental devotees of more primitive forms 209 259
186 deep antipathy to mobs (Herder carefully 210 260
187 drawn from a world alien to them. ‘When 212 262
188 impossible it is to say precisely what 213 263
189 from one language – that is, way of life – 214 264
190 Herder’s rejection of the historical myths of 215 266
191 is the central thesis of, to give it its 216 267
192 itself certainly not less in the writings 217 268
193 fit into some single pattern in terms 218 269–70
194 one wonders whether he ever more than merely 219 271
195 The notion of belonging is at the heart of 220 272
196 common pervasive pattern in virtue of which 221 273
197 what it is to belong to a family, a sect, a 222 275
198 This is so not because, as Voltaire maintained 223 276
199 human which may follow a leader but obey 224 277
200 all manifestations of art in their richest and 225 278
201 Herder was one of the leaders. To view oneself 226 280
202 something amiss about moralists who do not act 227 281
203 art, or of its specifically aesthetic function 228 282
204 to an equal extent created by it. A man 229 283
205 Russian novelists of the nineteenth century, 230 285
206 Finally, I come to what is perhaps the 231 286
207 easily forgotten. Others held that mankind was 232 287
208 in its own time and place and environment. We 233 289
209 civilizations which he so lovingly describes 234 290
210 and justice. This is Lessing’s conception 235 291
211 Herder wrote this in his journal in 1769. 237 293
212 for which men have rightly striven 238 294
213 both of reason and of dogma on which 239 295
214 Goethe and Schelling and their vitalistic 240 297
215 core of what individuates men or cultures 241 298
216 [con]spiracies by disciplined parties; the 242 299
ix Isaiah Berlin’s first publication 245 305
x amount of further work after the 245 306
xi discontinuous passages of varying 246 308
xii help has been indispensable 247 310
xiii intervention on my behalf that I 248 310
My account of Hamann, as Henry Hardy 249 312
I been so, I should not have agreed 250 313
Of course I do not wish to say that 251 314
historians of ideas, A. O. Lovejoy, appears 252 315
xiv The famous phrase ‘God-intoxicated 253 317
xv everything: imaginative intuition, 253 317
xvi only as a witness of a great deal 254 319
1 The most passionate, consistent, extreme 255 321
2 eccentric and isolated figure, about whose 255 321
3 Hamann’s disciple Jacobi transmitted 256 322
4 critics of modern times. Without 257 322
5 Hamann’s life, at any rate in its 258 324
6 for example), of Weigel, Arndt, and 258 324
7 [philos]ophy, mathematics, theology, 259 325
8 as an essayist or journalist. In common 260 326
9 All this was conventional enough, 261 327
10 an aristocrat. All this was shared by 262 328
11 Of all the German provinces of the 262 329
12 Hamann would play his part. His 263 330
13 foundation of a truly Christian life. 264 331
14 in states of spiritual oppression – 265 332
15 To what was he converted? Not just 265 333
16 him with great sympathy and immediately 266 334
17 her. From journalism he returned again 267 335
18 perfectly sane – a Catholic who 268 336
19 is a form of vanity. True, he does not 269 337
20 The fault is, quite deliberately, his 270 339
21 leaps, flowery allusions, outlandish 270 339
22 What is it that is today worth 272 341
23 violent, does – for Rousseau shares 272 341
24 achievements are, and remain, very great, 273 342
25 Herder seem models of pedantic neatness, 274 343
26 It is worth remembering that Hamann 276 345
27 others believed in the almost unlimited 276 346
28 after, namely happiness, knowledge, justice 277 346–7
29 through time and the possibility of universal 278 348
30 Wolff’s belief, enunciated in the 279 349
31 Descartes believed that it was possible 280 350
32 material objects round us that behaved 280 350
33 we cannot help believing any more than 281 351
34 and higher juices of the 282 352
35 to asymmetrical, untidy reality, the 283 353
36 This is in effect modern existentialism 283 354
37 necessary truths’? They cannot. ‘This 284 355
38 arbitrary abstractions... have generated 285 356
39 away, direct experience of God – 286 357
40 which of necessity is composed of words 287 358
41 exist in reality, as being more than 287 359
42 that he suffers from genuine prejudice 288 360
43 lead; for others he is principally a deist,289 361
44 criminals and to vagabonds and 290 362
45 which a man grasped his situation and 290 363
46 and things and their de facto 291 364
47 for him is one: feeling shapes belief 292 365
48 spectacles are for Hamann distorting 293 366
49 of natural law and the obligations that 294 367
50 [com]plex web of human relations was 294 368
51 could not eat an egg or drink a glass 295 369
52 Mendelssohn had been a friend, in some 296 370
53 be conceived of as deaf children whom 297 371
54 Reason is said by the secular philosophers 298 372
55 transcription – but why, with what end 298 373
56 often inscrutable purpose. To this 299 374
57 [identi]cal, too, with entire styles 300 375
58 perpetual divine creation, in accordance 301 376
59 provided by the Cartesians, or even the 302 376
60 figments that seek to substitute themselves 302 377
61 turned the savage violence of the Beasts 303 378
62 prudery, nor savages, nor Cynic 304 379
63 Lo! A shadow of horror is risen 305 380
64 That is precisely Hamann’s doctrine. 306 381
65 Blake was rational, scientific, secular 306 382
66 no issue; one must have rules but also 307 383
67 rationalism ultimately sprang from the 308 384
68 with other, particularly later, exasperated 309 385
69 in his own way have been right. Whatever 309 386
70 the angry prophet from the Brook Kerith, 310 387
71 It is no great distance from this to 311 388
72 Hamann’s view of language is at 313 390
73 Harris’s Hermes (1751) and the famous 313 390–1
74 invented nor revealed as a fully shaped 314 391
75 a process called thought or reasoning 315 392
76 ‘Language is the first and last organ 316 393
77 All speech, all art, all reflection, 317 394
78 sentences may resemble one another, or 317 395
79 immediate understanding, achieved by 318 396
80 that one is laying down, once and for 319 397
81 substitute for the immediacy of 320 398
82 of symbolism, and our creative imagination 321 399
83 own experience – ways determined by 321 400
84 it is a comedian who is playing.’ 322 401
85 intended to communicate – does not 323 402
86 biological, and psychological and social 324 403
87 with song and poetry, which precede 324–5404
88 are often least gifted in this respect. 325 405
89 school of philosophy was destined 326 406
90 that letter is spirit, and spirit is 327 407
91 [counter]feit goods, ‘false noses’, 328 408
92 tendency which, for such cultural historians 328 409
93 In most histories of German and 330 410
94 deeply about one’s own spiritual condition 330 410
95 deduce them. What is given is given; 331 411
96 expense of, or any rate beyond the 332 412
97 But this is not Hamann’s principal 333 413
98 company with this grim sect far more 334 414
99 things or men, in the fullness of life. 334 415
100 what Goethe famously called ‘grey 335 416
101 in which it was contained. ‘Beauty 336 417
102 myth of ‘beautiful nature, good taste 337 418
103 the old morality preached by Plato 338 419
104 importunate Athenians who pester 338 420
105 only way to awaken such deluded 339 421
106 rationalism, classicism, not only in 340 422
107 Hamann’s political views, such as they 341 423
108 of the moon, which cannot be expected 341 424
109 the slave’s rags? What is the use 342 424
110 passes from curses and blessings 343 425–6
111 But if one is to gain resources in 344 427
112 There is much else that is of value 346 428
113 first to step into them, if he wants to 346 428–9
114 enough, and sets himself to it, can invent 347 429
115 [mis]takenly ascribed it to Giordano 348 430
116 Virtue and philanthropy are no substitute 349 431
117 (or class) who cannot be brought to see 350 432
118 Hamann knows that not one reader in a 350 433
119 [connec]tion with Hamann’s views of 351 434
120 recognises only the individual and his 352 435
121 obscurantism, an attack on critical thought 353 436
122 the promotion of the only type of 353 437
123 which all knowledge and all values 354 438
124 of the Churches on the one hand, 355 439
125 the causes but the purposes of the 356 440
126 The possibility of applying quantitative 357 441
127 life, the conservative reaction of men 357 442
128 [genu]inely enlightened administrators. The 358 443
129 I alluded to the success in our own day 359 444
130 (e) Every language is a way of life, 359 444
131 This is surely a doctrine that was not wholly 360 445
132 relationship. Hamann represented himself, 361 446
133 The standard complete editions of Hamann’s 363 449
134 1985: Cambridge University Press), 363 449
135 Terence J. German, Hamann on Language 364 451**

* Corrected in later impressions to ‘...timetable of human history. [...] Even so, man cannot... ’.

** Changed, from 2013, to ‘At this point I previously gave a list of eight... ’.