Concordance to The Soviet Mind

The second edition, published as a Brookings Classic in 2016, has been completely reset. This concordance facilitates the conversion of page references to one edition into references to the other. The text of the second edition, which has been revised throughout, and added to, should be used in all new and revised translations. The concordance does not include the 2016 editorial introduction or the new appendix. Nor does it provide a page-by-page guide to the alphabetical glossary of names.

2004 First line (2004) 2016 Alterations
vii The task of a Communist ix
xi Isaiah Berlin believed xiv
xii and gossip xiv
xiii Great Goods xv
xiv one overarching xvi
xv was monistic xvii
xvi which must eventually xviii
xvii which concludes: ‘A new xix First two words omitted
xix PREFACE xxi Retitled ‘EDITOR’S INTRODUCTION TO THE FIRST EDITION’
xx showing the inadequacies xxii
xxi But he also wrote xxiii
xxii A Visit to Leningrad xxiv
xxiii garbage trucks xxv
xxiv sick, he did not xxv
xxv like the heroes xxvi
xxvi He said that the original xxviii
xxvii is the authentic xxix
xxviii The Artificial Dialectic xxx
xxix have always followed xxi
xxx You let me off xxxii
xxxi firm and not unfamiliar xxxiii
xxxii The revised script xxxiv
xxxiii returned). He replied xxxv
xxxiv arbitrary, and brutal xxxvi–
xxxvii
xxxv My friend Mr Utis xxxvii
xxxvi Berlin himself had asked xxxix
xxxvii unworthy to stand xl
xxxviii Papers, MS Berlin 571 xl Papers, Oxford, Bodleian Library, MS. Berlin 571
xxxix ‘The Artificial Dialectic xli
xl every detail xlii
1 THE ARTS IN RUSSIA 1
2 1900–1928 2
3 a truce by such figures 2–3
4 There occurred 3
5 [Com]mittee of the Communist 4
6 the convicted heretics 5
7 ‘repressed’, that is 6
8 contact with Western Europe 7
9 [feel]ing, but were too pure 8
10 the bureaucrats of literature 9
11 Suslov is responsible 10
12 not thoroughly secured 11
13 Bashir, Kazakh 12
14 halts for a word 13
15 [intellec]tually long dependent 14
16 with the old 15
17 [fac]tories or at the front 16
18 disagreement about means 17
19 grown without a 18
20 heaped-up opulence 18
21 feeling – or else 19
22 contemporary life 20
23 purest and most exacting 21
24 the merit of illustrating 22
25 the normal Russian share 23
26 temporary period 24
27 If there is one single 25
28 A VISIT TO LENINGRAD 27
29 look more pathetically 28
30 could sell in the market 28
31 viewed as something 29
32 Miss Tripp and I 30
33 would be devoted 31
34 Although stories have reached 32
35 Rakhlin, who was 33
36 beginnings. One of them 34
37 educated persons 35
38 many words 36
39 a kind of Holland House 37
40 course, another and 38
41 A GREAT RUSSIAN WRITER 39
42 violently egotistic 40
43 [experi]ence, the combination 40
44 convictions and 41
45 his who has any 42
46 and most civilised 43
47 who behaves creditably 44
48 imprisonment in Moscow 45
49 [fan]tastically complex web 46
50 But it seems to me 47
51 political rhetoric 48
52 The first and second 49
53 CONVERSATIONS 50
54 because that savage ruler 51
55 show trials 52
56 once with lines 52
57 Almost at once Pasternak 53
58 think, that to be thought 54
59 of him and his work 55
60 no great problem in this 56
61 His feelings towards Mayakovsky 57
62 was sacred to him 58
63 It was when he was in one 59
64 on at least two other 60
65 for fear of rendering 61
66 Yet, in 1945 62
67 a matter of life 63
68 asked what he intended 64
69 Malraux still writing? 65
70 report his judgement 66
71 First World War 67
72 while – it could 68
73 Akhmatova to offer 68
74 persons – Bertrand 69
75 book of poems 70 books of poems
76 over …’. It took 71
77 into a fallen woman 72
78 She then spoke about 73
79 words; the recollection 74
80 mind, in the grip of 75
81 whose very existence 76
82 in any respect based 77
83 not wish to be pitied 78
84 into a figure 79
85 BORIS PASTERNAK 80
86 hearted purity and devotion 81
87 [imme]diate experience 81–2
88 he creates. No artist 82
89 prose-writer but 83
90 WHY THE SOVIET UNION 85
91 method by which they 86
92 It is impossible to wonder 87
93 [them]selves: they really do 87
94 It is an attitude relaxed 88
95 [imperial]ism – and the Russians 89
96 thought in Russia 90
97 despite their odd 91
98 THE ARTIFICIAL DIALECTIC 92
99 one of the political processes 93
100 Here perhaps some recourse 94
101 conclusion that one 94
102 [non-]revolutionary situations 95
103 But whatever may be 96
104 older generation of 97
105 and memorable shafts 98
106 which no one has committed 99
107 obedience to those laws 100
108 essence of his policy 101
109 The policy of encouraging 102
110 present. However grotesque 103
111 hypothesi, never be mistaken 104
112 summer of 1951 105
113 formulae, and even 106
114 improvement of the morale 107
115 seem so enigmatical 108
116 imagination and practical 109
117 daily treadmill 110
118 success and capacity 111
119 FOUR WEEKS 112
120 number of citizens 113
121 secretaries’ of academies 113
122 fraternisation) they were 114
123 The deepest cleavage 115
124 Siberian imprisonment 116
125 their attitude towards 117
126 dethronement of Stalin 118
127 The governors are 119
128 those of the rawer 120
129 detested and accepted 121
130 SOVIET RUSSIAN CULTURE 122
131 generis, or whether 123 generis, or whether
132 of their own cultural 123
133 part to play in the march 124–5
134 of the public. This notion 125
135 [estab]lished, to make everyone 126
136 social goals on the basis 127
137 [bureau]cracy which would 128
138 producers were merely 129
139 of all, they were differences 130
140 It was part and parcel 131
141 yielded the most reliable 132
142 suppress or pervert 133
143 in which Lenin undoubtedly 134
144 very notion that there 135
145 world is being destroyed 136
146 may be the validity 137
147 [mak]ers of the revolution 138
148 archaeology – nothing 139
149 Stalin’s successors 140
150 to arise, because no 141
151 Economic exploitation 142
152 against the enemy 143
153 an immediate transition 144
154 work best, without being 145
155 policies in place of the 146
156 Whether they wish it or not 147
157 supposedly exists 148
158 expected of good Communists 149
159 [sine qua] non for obtaining 150 sine qua non for obtaining
160 they are one and all 151
161 [learn]ing that this was not so 152
162 moral terms to which 152
163 much the same way 153
164 They are not religious 154
165 [differ]ence between genuine 155
166 THE SURVIVAL 157
167 Fortunately, the situation 158
168 managed to survive 159
169 where the oppressors 159
170–
228
GLOSSARY OF NAMES 181–
244
229 FURTHER READING 245
230 A Remarkable Decade 246
231 ‘Soviet Beginnings’ 246
232 this institution are to 247
233 ‘Russian Thought and the 248