Corrections to The Power of Ideas

Corrections to 2nd edition

The second edition (2013) was completely revised throughout, and translations should be made from this edition, with the additional corrections listed below.

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i 3–1 up the first three […] Pottle. all those listed above, and a four-volume edition of his letters.
iii [add at end:] Affirming: Letters 1975–1997

Corrections to 1st edition

The superseded list below may be of use to owners of the first edition (2000). It includes (but is not exhausted by) the corrections made in later impressions of that edition. Corrections in this colour apply only to the English-language edition, the asterisked correction only to translations.

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xv [add the following note after a three-line space:]
Note to the paperback edition

In this edition I have corrected a few small errors that came to light after the book was first published.
    I am also now able to give a more precise source for ‘interested error’ than that offered on p. 135 below, note 1. It seems most likely that IB took this phrase from an excessively free passage in a translation of Holbach’s Système de la nature. In part 1, chapter 1, ‘De la nature’, Holbach writes: ‘recourons à nos sens, que l’on nous a faussement fait regarder comme suspects’. In his 1820 translation Samuel Wilkinson renders this ‘let us recover our senses, which interested error has taught us to suspect’. H. D. Robinson borrows Wilkinson’s invention in his 1868 version: ‘let us fall back on our senses, which errour, interested errour, has taught us to suspect’.
    However creative this Englishing may be, the sentiment is thoroughly Holbachian, as the quotations in the note on p. 135 illustrate.
    I am grateful to Roger Hausheer for putting me on to the trail of this hitherto elusive phrase – one of which Berlin was fond.

H.H.
5 up [English paperback only] thoroughy thoroughly
6 note 1, 4 Pécqeur Pecqueur
10 note 1, 3 items thus
*135 note 1 [substitute the following:] It seems most likely that IB took this phrase from an excessively free passage in a translation of Holbach’s Système de la nature. In part 1, chapter 1, ‘De la nature’, Holbach writes: ‘recourons à nos sens, que l’on nous a faussement fait regarder comme suspects’. In his 1820 translation Samuel Wilkinson renders this ‘let us recover our senses, which interested error has taught us to suspect’. H. D. Robinson borrows Wilkinson’s invention in his 1868 version: ‘let us fall back on our senses, which errour, interested errour, has taught us to suspect’. The sentiment, however, is thoroughly characteristic of Holbach, who writes, for example, of ‘erreurs utiles’, ibid.,  part 2, chapter 12, and of ‘hommes fortement intéressés à l’erreur’ in Le Bon Sens, § 82. Ed.
[add at end of note:] [See now also p. xv above.]
225 [s.v. Auerbach] Erich, 173 Berthold (originally Moses Baruch Auerbacher), 173
229 Gaulle [insert new entry after this:] Gavrilov, Mihailov Ivan (also known as Vancho Mihailov), 124
234 Mihailov [delete ‘,102’ and insert new entry after Mickiewicz:] Mihailov, Ivan, see Gavrilov, Mihailov Ivan
236 [sv. Palestine] 162 150
[sv. Pécqeur] Pécqeur Pecqueur